What About Pollution

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‘Sustainable Food’

Organic Agriculture is The Key to Solving World Hunger

Researchers have concluded that organic farming can sustainably feed the global population. Through the review of hundreds of published studies, Washington State University researchers have found evidence that organic farming can produce sufficient yields, be profitable for farmers, protect and improve the environment and be safer for farm workers. Written by John Reganold, WSU regents professor of soil science and agroecology and doctoral candidate Jonathan Watcherhe, the review study, “Organic Agriculture in the 21st Century”, is featured as the cover story for February issue of the journal Nature Plants. It is the first study of its kind to analyze 40 years of science that compares organic and conventional agriculture across the four goals of sustainability identified by the National… Read More

The Year in Sustainable Food: Much Progress, and More Work to Be Done

Peter Lehner, Executive Director, New York City The movement for a clean, sustainable food supply built up quite a head of steam in 2014. Many of this year’s happenings had me and my colleagues at NRDC cheering; some had us shaking our heads—and rolling up our sleeves. Here’s our look back at the year in food. 1.  Nation’s Largest School Districts to Serve Antibiotic-Free Chicken The Urban School Food Alliance, a group that represents six of the nation’s largest public school districts, announced in December that it would seek antibiotic-free chicken from its suppliers. The decision affects more than the food of the 2.9 million school children these districts serve—it’s a move that will encourage a shift toward more… Read More

In New York City, a Food Movement Worthy of the Name

Margaret Brown, Legal Fellow, New York Program, New York Last year, Michael Pollan raised the question of “whether or not there is a ‘food movement’ in America worthy of the name — that is, an organized force in our politics capable of demanding change in the food system.” He wrote this in regard to Prop 37 in California—a battle the food movement did not win—though NRDC supported the initiative. But here in New York City, food activists are beginning to show some real political muscle—including getting involved in NYC mayor’s race. This past summer, six of the then-candidates came together for the first-ever Mayoral Forum on Food. The moderator, NYU professor and longtime food movement leader, Marion Nestle, asked… Read More