What About Pollution

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Greenhouse Gas Emissions’

4 undeniable signs we’re making progress on climate change

By Fred Krupp Seven months ago, I made a strong statement that may have left some people shaking their heads. I said that we can turn the corner on climate change – end the centuries-long rise in greenhouse gas emissions and see them peak and begin to decline – in just five short years. As it turns out, 2015 is shaping up to be a year of giant steps toward that goal. In a deeply reported New York Magazine piece, political writer Jonathan Chait calls it “the year humans finally got serious about saving themselves.” Says Chait, “The world is suddenly responding to the climate emergency with – by the standards of its previous behavior – astonishing speed.” I agree. Here are four reasons I believe… Read More

3 Ways the Clean Power Plan Will Strengthen Our Economy

By Jim Marston (This post originally appeared on EDF Voices) On Monday, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Power Plan, the first initiative of its kind to curb carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from existing U.S. power plants. By improving air quality, the plan promises to prevent 90,000 childhood asthma attacks and avoid up to 3,600 premature deaths each year – without compromising economic growth. In fact, the Clean Power Plan is an incredible economic opportunity that states can’t afford to miss. By limiting power plants’ “free pass” to pollute, EPA projects their Plan will deliver billions of dollars in environmental and public health benefits each year – and that’s just the start. Here are three ways in which… Read More

Climate hope amid melting ice, rising temps

By Ilissa Ocko (This post originally appeared on EDF Voices) An ice berg drifts off a West Antarctica glacier — Courtesy NASA   As 2014 draws to a close, two recent developments show that global temperatures are rising at an alarming rate. The world, it seems, is on a run-away train – and yet, we have more reason to feel hopeful than we did a year ago. I’ll explain why that is. But first, let’s have a look at where we are right now. West Antarctica ice sheet loss is accelerating The latest science shows that ice loss from West Antarctica has been increasing nearly three times faster in the past decade than during the previous one – and much quicker than scientists… Read More

Risky Business stands out in growing sea of climate reports

By Gernot Wagner Receding beach on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Source: FEMA/Tim Burkitt (This blog originally appeared on EDF Voices) This blog post was co-authored by Jonathan Camuzeaux. Put Republican Hank Paulson, Independent Mike Bloomberg, and Democrat Tom Steyer together, and out comes one of the more unusual – and unusually impactful – climate reports. This year alone has seen a couple of IPCC tomes, an entry by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the most recent U.S. National Climate Assessment. The latest, Risky Business, stands apart for a number of reasons, and it’s timely with the nation debating proposed, first-ever limits on greenhouse gas emissions from nearly 500 power plants. Tri-partisan coalition tackles climate change The… Read More

The cheapest way to cut climate pollution? Energy efficiency

By EDF Blogs This blog post was co-authored by Lauren Navarro, California Senior Manager, Clean Energy and Kate Zerrenner, an EDF project manager and expert on energy efficiency and climate change. On June 2, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency made a historic announcement that will change how we make, move and use electricity for generations to come. For the first time in history, the government proposed limits on the amount of carbon pollution American fossil-fueled power plants are allowed to spew into the atmosphere. There are two clear winners to comply with the plan while maintaining commitment to electric reliability and affordability: energy efficiency and demand response. We’re already seeing pushback from some of our nation’s big polluter states, such as West Virginia and Texas. But… Read More

Study: Climate change may push hurricanes farther north, south

By Ilissa Ocko A satellite image of Irene, a Category 1 hurricane, as it made landfall in North Carolina in August of 2011. Source: NASA/NOAA GOES project The hurricane season of 2014 just kicked off, and with two devastating storms wreaking havoc along the northeastern United States coast over the last few years, it’s no wonder everyone’s on edge. We’re concerned about hurricanes becoming more frequent and intense, and about the worsening storm surge caused by a rise in sea levels. But flying under the radar is a fourth link between hurricanes and climate change: how climate change affects the location of hurricanes. A new study led by researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Princeton… Read More

EPA Hands Over the Keys with Clean Power Plan, California Already on Cruise Control

By Derek Walker EPA’s Clean Power Plan, proposed today, is a roadmap for cutting dangerous pollution from power plants, and as with any map, there are many roads to follow. For this journey, states are in the driver’s seat and can steer themselves in the direction most beneficial to their people and to the state’s economy, as long as they show EPA they are staying on the map and ultimately reaching the final destination. As usual, California got off to a head start, explored the territory, blazed a lot of new trails, and left a number of clues on how states can transition to a lower carbon future, and California’s successes are one proven, potential model for other states to follow.… Read More