What About Pollution

What are YOU going to Do!

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Indoor Air Pollution Prevention and Protection

Breathing in polluted air introduces toxins into every cell of the body within moments. Indoor air in the United States can be up to 100 times more polluted than the air outdoors. Understanding air pollution and its effects on the human body is the first step to making choices that will help people lead healthier lives. Imagine living in a home filled with clean air, so much so that it reduces some of the recurring symptoms related to air pollution: Wheezing Sneezing Congestion Fatigue Coughing Itchy nose or skin Watery or dry eyes Here’s one indisputable fact: Human beings need oxygen to live. Oxygen is what keeps all of our organs functioning so the quality of what we breath… Read More

Why “Just Say No” is Just Plain Wrong: the Sound Legal Basis for the Clean Power Plan

By Tomas Carbonell   The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will soon finalize the Clean Power Plan — a suite of historic Clean Air Act standards that will establish the first nationwide limits on carbon pollution from America’s fossil fuel-fired power plants. Rigorous carbon pollution standards for the nation’s power sector will yield immense benefits for the health of our families and communities, for the American economy, and for a safer climate for our children. Yet in the months leading up to the release of the Clean Power Plan clean air standards, coal companies and other entities that oppose reasonable limits on carbon pollution have lobbed a series of flawed and failed lawsuits directed at stopping EPA from finishing… Read More

5 reasons EPA is right about tougher smog standards

By Elena Craft, PhD (This post originally appeared on EDF Voices) image by Robert S. Donovan The Environmental Protection Agency last week released much-awaited, tighter standards for smog pollution, common-sense protections that will save lives and safeguard human health from one of the nation’s most ubiquitous air pollutants – ozone. As expected, it took but a few hours before critics lashed out, while ignoring key facts behind EPA’s proposal. Here are five reasons EPA is on the right track: 1. The current standard doesn’t do enough to protect human health About half our population, some 156 million Americans, areat risk from smog, or ground-level ozone, because of age, health conditions, or the work that they do. They include more than 25 million people… Read More

Another Groundbreaking Study Emerges Linking Agricultural Pesticides To Autism – And That’s Not All

Numerous studies have clearly outlined the health and environmental dangers that are associated with pesticides, more specifically, agricultural pesticides. They’ve been linked to cancer, birth defects, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, kidney failure and many more. It’s remarkable how we continue to spray these all over our food. In the past decade alone, scientists from all over the world have conducted studies that now link them with autism. Keep in mind, autism is a very large spectrum, some of it may be evolution, and in many other cases, neurodevelopment is largely hampered  due to the factors mentioned in this article (and more). Here is one of the (out of what could be many) reasons why: Pesticides Increase Risk By 2/3… Read More

Arsenic Pollution Has Decimated This Village In China And Cursed The Population With Cancer [PHOTOS]

HESHAN China (Reuters) – Xiong Demin could not have foreseen that the mine he worked at for 32 years would leave his home village poisoned and hundreds of residents, including himself and his wife, stricken with cancer. The 71-year-old retired mechanic and his wife, Wen Jin’e, both suffer from cancer, which they blame on arsenic pollution left by the mining and processing of realgar, also known as “ruby sulphur”, near Heshan village in Hunan province. “She and I wake up every day just to await death, there is nothing we can do, there is no hope,” said Xiong, as he lifted his shirt to show skin lesions and warts on his belly, back and legs. Arsenic and inorganic arsenic compounds, often used for herbicides, wood preservatives and in the metallurgical industry, are… Read More

Risky Business stands out in growing sea of climate reports

By Gernot Wagner Receding beach on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Source: FEMA/Tim Burkitt (This blog originally appeared on EDF Voices) This blog post was co-authored by Jonathan Camuzeaux. Put Republican Hank Paulson, Independent Mike Bloomberg, and Democrat Tom Steyer together, and out comes one of the more unusual – and unusually impactful – climate reports. This year alone has seen a couple of IPCC tomes, an entry by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the most recent U.S. National Climate Assessment. The latest, Risky Business, stands apart for a number of reasons, and it’s timely with the nation debating proposed, first-ever limits on greenhouse gas emissions from nearly 500 power plants. Tri-partisan coalition tackles climate change The… Read More

Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act — Cooperative Federalism and Performance-Based Standards

By Megan Ceronsky One year ago this June, President Obama directed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop Carbon Pollution Standards for existing power plants — a key component of his Climate Action Plan. The President charged EPA with launching the effort “through direct engagement with States, as they will play a central role in establishing and implementing standards for existing power plants.” Congress laid the groundwork for this dynamic federal-state collaboration in 1970 when it provided for national environmental performance standards for sectors that are major sources of dangerous air pollution. Under this program  (Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act) EPA identifies the “best system of emission reduction” available to address dangerous air pollution from existing pollution… Read More