What About Pollution

What are YOU going to Do!

Policy’

Why “Just Say No” is Just Plain Wrong: the Sound Legal Basis for the Clean Power Plan

By Tomas Carbonell   The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will soon finalize the Clean Power Plan — a suite of historic Clean Air Act standards that will establish the first nationwide limits on carbon pollution from America’s fossil fuel-fired power plants. Rigorous carbon pollution standards for the nation’s power sector will yield immense benefits for the health of our families and communities, for the American economy, and for a safer climate for our children. Yet in the months leading up to the release of the Clean Power Plan clean air standards, coal companies and other entities that oppose reasonable limits on carbon pollution have lobbed a series of flawed and failed lawsuits directed at stopping EPA from finishing… Read More

5 reasons EPA is right about tougher smog standards

By Elena Craft, PhD (This post originally appeared on EDF Voices) image by Robert S. Donovan The Environmental Protection Agency last week released much-awaited, tighter standards for smog pollution, common-sense protections that will save lives and safeguard human health from one of the nation’s most ubiquitous air pollutants – ozone. As expected, it took but a few hours before critics lashed out, while ignoring key facts behind EPA’s proposal. Here are five reasons EPA is on the right track: 1. The current standard doesn’t do enough to protect human health About half our population, some 156 million Americans, areat risk from smog, or ground-level ozone, because of age, health conditions, or the work that they do. They include more than 25 million people… Read More

Risky Business stands out in growing sea of climate reports

By Gernot Wagner Receding beach on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Source: FEMA/Tim Burkitt (This blog originally appeared on EDF Voices) This blog post was co-authored by Jonathan Camuzeaux. Put Republican Hank Paulson, Independent Mike Bloomberg, and Democrat Tom Steyer together, and out comes one of the more unusual – and unusually impactful – climate reports. This year alone has seen a couple of IPCC tomes, an entry by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the most recent U.S. National Climate Assessment. The latest, Risky Business, stands apart for a number of reasons, and it’s timely with the nation debating proposed, first-ever limits on greenhouse gas emissions from nearly 500 power plants. Tri-partisan coalition tackles climate change The… Read More

The cheapest way to cut climate pollution? Energy efficiency

By EDF Blogs This blog post was co-authored by Lauren Navarro, California Senior Manager, Clean Energy and Kate Zerrenner, an EDF project manager and expert on energy efficiency and climate change. On June 2, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency made a historic announcement that will change how we make, move and use electricity for generations to come. For the first time in history, the government proposed limits on the amount of carbon pollution American fossil-fueled power plants are allowed to spew into the atmosphere. There are two clear winners to comply with the plan while maintaining commitment to electric reliability and affordability: energy efficiency and demand response. We’re already seeing pushback from some of our nation’s big polluter states, such as West Virginia and Texas. But… Read More

EPA Hands Over the Keys with Clean Power Plan, California Already on Cruise Control

By Derek Walker EPA’s Clean Power Plan, proposed today, is a roadmap for cutting dangerous pollution from power plants, and as with any map, there are many roads to follow. For this journey, states are in the driver’s seat and can steer themselves in the direction most beneficial to their people and to the state’s economy, as long as they show EPA they are staying on the map and ultimately reaching the final destination. As usual, California got off to a head start, explored the territory, blazed a lot of new trails, and left a number of clues on how states can transition to a lower carbon future, and California’s successes are one proven, potential model for other states to follow.… Read More

Why you only get 25% of the electricity you pay for

By EDF Blogs By Ronny Sandoval What would you say if I told you that about three-quarters of what you spend on electricity every month is wasted? Considering that Americans spend about $350 billion on electricity annually, I hope you’ll find this as shocking as I do. From generation to delivery to consumption, inefficiencies at every step of electricity’s journey add up to a lot of waste. Fortunately, these same conditions present us with opportunities to substantially reduce inefficiencies and their associated economic, social, and environmental impacts. Generation: Energy is wasted at the source Today, the majority of the electricity produced in the United States originates from fossil fuels, including coal and natural gas. According to the United States Environmental Protection… Read More